Archives for category: IUFSD elections

May 19, 2015 Election Results

Budget Vote:
Yes: 835 No: 373

Proposition to Introduce a Capital Reserve Fund:
Yes: 625 No: 313

BOE Trustee Election: (2 open seats)
Michael Hanna: 816
Catherine Palmieri: 809
Robyn Kerner: 626

Congratulations to Mike & Catherine!

And very sorry to see Robyn go——

Candidates Debate | 2015

Irvington Parents Forum at Yahoo Groups
Irvington Parents Forum on Facebook
Irvington Union Free School District
BoardDocs
Irvington USFD Board Meetings – YouTube

Montgomery won an absolute majority, Grados a plurality.

May 21, 2013
Total voters: 1,719
.
% of
total
voters
John Montgomery 891 52%
Bob Grados 771 45%
Seth Oster 575 33%
David Graeber 558 32%

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE:  
5.21.2013 Official Vote Count
IRVINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT
OFFICIAL VOTE COUNT MAY 21, 2013
original dimensions: width=”300″ height=”125″

Click image to enlarge
Screenshot Little Figures That Are Not There
Statistics taken out of context can be misleading.


“The little figures that are not there” is the title of Chapter 3 in Daryl Huff’s 1954 classic, How to Lie with Statistics.

Irvington Insight | Budget | May 13, 2013 | page 1 (pdf file)

The “fund balance” is the budget surplus, sometimes called a “rainy day” fund. By definition, it is money listed in the budget that is not designated to pay for programs. Districts have been advised to use the fund balance to stay within the tax cap, and in the May 2013 election 97% of NY districts did so. IUFSD chose to break the cap in order to keep its fund balance at the maximum allowable under the law — while borrowing $3.5 million to pay tax certs.

Year Fund  balance (budget surplus) Percent of budget
2008-2009 $1,949,375 3.85%
2009-2010 $2,040,362 4%
2011-2012 $2,012,995 4%
2012-2013 $2,046,240 4%
2013-2014 $2,162,800 4%
Amount by which 2013-2014 budget overrides tax cap $1,277,756

Sources:

AND SEE:

A parent’s explanation of bullet voting:

Bullet voting is an option in any election in which more than one seat is open and voters can cast two or more ballots. These situations tend to occur in school board and city council elections.

Bullet voting makes sense in elections in which a voter’s favorite candidate has a shot at getting the last open seat but isn’t likely to win the first seat.

Let¹s say, for example, that at the time you and 10 of your fellow Ms. A supporters get to the voting station, Mr. B is leading Ms. A by 4 votes for the second seat. The eleven of you are the last citizens to vote. If all of you vote for both Ms. A and Mr. B, he will maintain his four-vote lead and win the second seat. But if all 11 of you vote for Ms. A alone (that is, 11 votes for her and none for Mr. B), you would erase her 4-vote deficit and give her a 7-vote lead over Mr. B. In that case, Ms. A would win the second seat.

The scenario would be different if you were convinced that Ms. A is a shoo-in for the first seat. In that case, you’d want to use your second vote to help either Mr. B beat out Ms. C for the second seat.

If you can’t count on Ms. A coming in first, and you don’t think she has a lock on the second seat, either, you should probably bullet vote for her.

Source: Irvington Parents Forum

If the budget does not pass on the first vote, the district will put up the same budget, with a smaller “fund balance” (surplus), and we will vote again. The second budget will use the surplus to stay within the cap.

Here’s a picture: Singapore Math explains the budget.

If that budget fails, then, yes, we go to a 0% budget-to-budget increase.

Tuesday’s vote is on the size of the surplus, nothing more. We are voting on whether we want to run a $2.1 million surplus.


From the BOCES explainer posted on the district’s website:

If a proposed budget is defeated by voters, a school district—as in the past—has the option of putting the same or a revised budget up for a revote, or adopting a contingent budget. If a proposed budget is defeated twice by voters, a district must adopt a contingent budget. Certain existing contingent budget requirements remain in effect that prohibit spending in specific areas including community use of buildings, certain salary increases and new equipment purchases.

More significantly, under the new law, a district that adopts a contingent budget may not increase its current tax levy by any amount—which would impose, in effect, a zero percent cap. As of this writing, it is unclear if exemptions will apply.

  VOTES, VOTERS, AND BULLET VOTES
  ROBYN KERNER  797
  MARIA KASHKIN  732
  ROBYNE CAMP  705
  JOHN DAWSON  391
  DELLA LENZ  320
 TOTAL  2945
 TOTAL # INDIVIDUAL VOTERS  1578
 TOTAL # POTENTIAL VOTES FOR 2 SEATS (2 X 1578)  3156
 TOTAL # (possible) BULLET VOTES (3156 – 2945)   211

People hate to bullet vote.


AND SEE:
what people who do not have children in the schools pay to educate the children of people who do
how we got here
4 is not 2
budget vote
Core Knowledge: curriculum & property values