Archives for category: Superintendent

At HuffPo:

10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12

I haven’t read the literature on handheld devices and exposure to blue light after dark myself, so I don’t have an informed opinion one way or the other.

What concerns me greatly, however, is the fact that our superintendent has not read the literature, either, yet he has established a goal of making technology in the classroom as “ubiquitous” as pencil and paper.

From what I can see, the board of education is not enthusiastic about technology for the sake of technology; to the best of my knowledge, the board has not voted to make technology “ubiquitous.”

Unfortunately, the fact that the board has not established a formal goal of making technology ubiquitous is neither here nor there.

Seeking board approval for a policy change is not a strength of our current superintendent.

AND SEE:
Response to administrator technology memo
Buying technology – business v. schools
John D on flipped classrooms and board policy
Wrong track
“Our goal”
The digital natives are restless
Flipped classrooms (and more) in IUFSD
Email from an NYU student on his experience in a flipped classroom

Hi Kris –

In the 1/28/2014 BOE meeting, the administration mentioned that more classes involving other grades will be flipped this spring.

Could you let me know which classes, subjects, and grades will be involved?

Thanks so much!

Catherine

UPDATE 4.11.2014: Flipped classrooms applauded in district newsletter

UPDATE 5.20.2015: Still waiting for an answer.

AND SEE:
Math teacher (and member of CC development team) Vern Williams on
flipped classrooms

Email from an NYU student on his experience with a flipped classroom

“We do need to find out whether it works for Irvington and if it works for our curriculum,” he says. “The Board expects and will ask – as we have asked with any effort that the administration [puts forth] – for them to give us the results of the findings of whether it has worked or not.”
Irvington Schools Flipped
Written by David Neilsen
Friday, 21 February 2014

In my experience, there aren’t many school-board presidents who would say this.

For any number of reasons, school boards across the country have lost control of the schools they head. Superintendents manage boards, not the other way around.

A few years back I attended a school-board meeting at which a board member asked the then-superintendent whether she talked to her fellow superintendents about …. curriculum, I think it was.

She said she didn’t. Instead, she spent her time talking to her peers about ‘how to manage our boards.’

How to manage our boards: those are pretty close to her exact words. I was so shocked I thought I must have misunderstood, but a friend of mine who was also present confirmed that our superintendent had indeed just told the board, publicly, that when speaking to her peers her main topic of conversation was board management.

That’s not the way it’s supposed to be (to put it mildly), and that’s not the way it used to be somewhere back in the mists of time. I don’t know when things changed.

The legal reality is that public schools are government entities, and school boards are the elected officials we the people choose to head them.

Our elected officials, serving as the board, set the mission; the executive executes the mission. 

The board evaluates the executive’s effectiveness.

In really-existing reality, however, superintendents run circles around school boards. They swamp board members with document dumps in the form of board books, bamboozle them with verbiage that could be taken from the Educational Jargon Generator, and refuse to measure results or even take surveys. Their subordinates are directed to do likewise.

Irvington is, I think, fairly unique — and fortunate — in having a school board that is attempting to restore the proper lines of authority.

Irvington Parents Forum at Yahoo Groups
Irvington Parents Forum on Facebook
Irvington Union Free School District
Irvington USFD Board Meetings – YouTube

If the student is watching a video, there can be no interaction. This generation already has enough problems with face-to-face communication. Also, how well constructed can the lesson be if a student can have a question in the beginning of the video that doesn’t get answered until the next day? This sounds like a way of forcing technology into education instead of using it as a tool to enhance learning. This is a dangerous slope to go down and clearly one that the BOE (which is responsible for policy creation), must be well aware of before implementation.
John D – Teacher and former member of IUFSD BOE

AND SEE:
Tweets from high school students in flipped classrooms
Buying technology – business v. schools
Response to administrator technology memo
John D on flipped classrooms and board policy
Wrong track
“Our goal”
The digital natives are restless
Flipped classrooms (and more) in IUFSD
Email from an NYU student on his experience in a flipped classroom
Math teacher (and member of CC development team) Vern Williams on
flipped classrooms

Our goal and expectation is for the integration of technology to become as ubiquitous as pencil and paper in our classrooms.
Creating the Vision for Technology

The vendors are circling.

UPDATE 3/2/2014: No they’re not. The vendors are circling, part 2

AND SEE:
Are flipped classrooms the most exciting thing happening here?
Creating an IUFSD Technology Vision
Creating an IUFSD Technology Vision – ANNOTATED – 1.2.2014
Response to administrator technology memo
IEF #25 Off Cycle Grant Request – Expanding the Possibilites of
..Learning Through Technology Rich Classrooms – 2013-14

“Our goal”
Wrong track
Flipped classrooms (and more) in IUFSD
John D on flipped classrooms and board policy
Buying technology – business v. schools

Students and flipped classrooms
The digital natives are restless
Email from an NYU student on his experience in a flipped classroom

Health and screens
Education Week | ‘Blue Light’ May Impair Students’ Sleep, Studies Say
Blue Light Stimulates Cognitive Activity in Visually Blind
Ten reasons why handheld devices are unsafe for children

“Digital natives”
So-Called “Digital Natives” Not Media Savvy, New Study Shows
Digital natives (London School of Economics)
Jakob Nielsen, 2005: Usability of Websites for Teenagers Scroll down
for “Misconceptions About Teenagers.”
Jakob Nielsen, 2013: Teenage Usability: Designing Teen-Targeted
Websites
 by HOA LORANGER and JAKOB NIELSEN on February 4,
2013

AND SEE:
Technology

Flipped classrooms
1-to-1 computing